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  • ConExpo show Guide from International Cranes and Specialized Transport


    A buoyant mood already surrounded this year’s big industry show in North America months before the start of ConExpo 2014 in Las Vegas. Between 4 and 8 March 2014 visitors to the spectacular desert city will be treated to a similarly impressive display of new construction equipment, components and services over an exhibition area of 213,680 square metres.

    As usual, cranes will be the kings of the show, dominating the main Gold and Silver outdoor lots at the Las Vegas Convention Center. Some surprises are being kept until the show opens but there is already an impressive list of new machines that have been announced to whet the appetite prior to the event. IC’s news pages on www.khl.com over the last few months have carried some early information. Return to Total Equipment Training for further last minute updates in the lead up to the show.

    Hatton, Laura. "ConExpo Show Guide from International Cranes and Specialized Transport."KHL.com. KHL Group, 21 Feb. 2014. Web. 17 Mar. 2014.

  • OSHA Issues Proposed Rule Extending Crane Operator Compliance Date


    According to a press release from OSHA, the organization has issued a proposed rule to extend the compliance date for the crane operator certification requirement by three years. The proposed rule would extend the date to November 10, 2017, while also extending the existing phase-in requirement that employers ensure that their operators are qualified to use the equipment to the same date.

    In August 2010, OSHA issued a final standard on requirements for cranes and derricks in construction work that requires a crane operator on a construction site to meet one of four qualification/certification options by November 10, 2014. A number of parties raised concern about the date, and after several public meetings, OSHA has decided to extend the enforcement date, according to the press release. OSHA proposed extending the date so that the certification requirements do not take effect during potential rulemaking.

    For more information on the meetings, the rule and to comment, visit OSHA.gov.

    "OSHA Issues Proposed Rule Extending Crane Operator Compliance Date." OSHA Issues Proposed Rule Extending Crane Operator Compliance Date -- Occupational Health & Safety. OSHA, 11 Feb. 2014. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. <http://ohsonline.com/articles/2014/02/11/osha-issues-proposed-rule-extending-crane-operator-compliance-date.aspx?admgarea=ht.FireSafety>.

  • NCCCO to Offer Certification, Safety Demos, Examiner Workshops at CONEXPO 2014


    FAIRFAX, Va., Jan. 9, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Live equipment demonstrations, nationally accredited certification examinations,  education sessions and practical examiner training will all go to make for the largest ever participation at any construction event in almost two decades by the National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) at the forthcoming CONEXPO/CON-AGG, the Virginia-based non-profit organization has announced.

    (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140109/DC44087)

    New candidates and existing certificants alike will be given an opportunity to take a wide variety of ANSI-accredited and OSHA-compliant CCO written, practical, and recertification exams at CONEXPO/CON-AGG, to be held March 4–8, 2014, in Las Vegas, NV.  And thanks to NCCCO's "Visit CONEXPO-Leave Certified" program featuring onsite scoring and immediate test results, successful candidates will be able to walk away from the event certified.  Additionally, practical examiner workshops for most CCO programs will be conducted onsite before and after the exposition.

    NCCCO will again co-sponsor the Lift Safety Zone now relocated to the Gold Lot, the acknowledged "nexus" of the show's crane exhibits.  NCCCO is also sponsoring a series of educational seminars in CONEXPO's new Crane & Rigging track developed at the request of the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM). All of these activities promote safe practices on construction sites and illustrate the need for qualified personnel, in line with state and federal requirements.

    The once-every-three-years equipment showcase will feature over 2,400 exhibitors and is expected to draw more than 130,000 attendees. "CONEXPO/CON-AGG provides an excellent opportunity for expo attendees to earn or renew their CCO certifications while attending one of the largest events of its kind in the world," noted NCCCO Executive Director Graham Brent.

    NCCCO's activities at CONEXPO/CON-AGG 2014 include:

    Lift Safety Zone (G-1817 in Gold Lot)—featuring live CCO practical exam demonstrations, and crane and rigging safety best practices with a special emphasis on operating cranes safely around power lines
    NCCCO Information Booth (GL-20000)—providing information about all CCO certification programs as well as NCCCO's activities around the exposition
    CCO Written, Practical, and Recertification Exam Administrations—allowing candidates to recertify or earn new CCO certification(s)
    Practical Examiner Accreditation Workshops for aspiring CCO crane operator, rigger, and signalperson examiners, held before and after the main exposition
    Educational Seminars—featuring world-class experts providing up-to-the-minute information on an array of issues of critical importance to crane users in construction.

    "CONEXPO/CON-AGG is delighted that the National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators has elected to schedule its OSHA-recognized and ANSI-accredited crane operator and related certification examinations at the 2014 event," said Megan Tanel, vice president of exhibitions and events for the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), the organization that operates CONEXPO/CON-AGG. "This will provide an exceptional opportunity for crane operators and those who work around cranes to ensure that they are professionally certified to work in compliance with the pending OSHA rules on crane and lifting personnel."

    NCCCO Information Booth

    NCCCO's main informational exhibit will be in its usual prime location at booth GL-20000 in the Grand Lobby by the North Hall next to Silver Lot and just across from the Gold Lot, where the world's leading crane manufacturers will be located. NCCCO staff will be on hand throughout the exhibition to answer questions about all CCO certification programs currently available and in development. Visitors will be able to watch videos of NCCCO practical exams, as well as enter a drawing for die-cast model cranes generously donated by the world's leading manufacturers.

    CCO Certification Exam Administrations

    On Tuesday, March 4 and Friday, March 7, CONEXPO/CON-AGG attendees will be able to sit for any of the ANSI-accredited CCO written exams in dedicated rooms located near the NCCCO booth. This includes all programs, both regular and recertification exams. To register and for the complete schedule of written exams, please contact Shawna Parham atsparham@nccco.org. Preregistration is required for all written exams and for the Signalperson and Rigger Level I practical exams.

    On all five days of the show, CCO practical exams will be offered for mobile, service truck, and articulating crane operators. On Wednesday and Thursday practical exams will be offered for the Signalperson and Rigger Level I programs. To register and schedule practical exams, please contact Erin Jones at ejones@nccco.org.

    Practical Examiner Accreditation Program Workshops

    In the days before, during, and after the exposition, NCCCO will hold Practical Examiner Accreditation Program (PEAP) workshops for CCO certificants seeking to become Practical Examiners for CCO programs. Two-day workshops for articulating cranes and service truck cranes will be held before the expo on February 28-March 1; a three-day mobile crane PEAP will be held after the expo on March 9-11 with a one day refresher workshop on March 8; a one-day Signalperson workshop will be held on March 8; a two-day Rigger Level I on March 9-10; and a two-day Rigger Level II workshop will be held on March 11-12. Please direct any questions about the PEAP workshops to Erin Jones at ejones@nccco.org. Preregistration is required for all PEAP workshops.

    Lift Safety Zone

    For the second time at CONEXPO, NCCCO is co-sponsoring the Lift Safety Zone (LSZ).  Developed in conjunction with the International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) and centrally located in Gold Lot #1817, the LSZ will once again profile best practices in crane and rigging activities with live demonstrations throughout the event.  Industry experts will be on hand to provide practical safety advice to those who operate, manage, and work with cranes and aerial lifts. NCCCO's mobile crane practical exams and CCO rigger certification will be prominently featured.

    Educational Seminars

    The show's organizer, the Association of Equipment Manufacturer (AEM) has provided an exceptional opportunity for a dedicated Crane and Rigging education track at CONEXPO 2014, and NCCCO has assisted in assembling a stellar lineup of presentations on a host of crane and rigging topics. All speakers are veteran safety professionals and experts in their field, and many actively participate in the NCCCO Commission and exam management committees. The following seminars are planned for the Crane & Rigging seminar track:

    2014 OSHA Requirements for Crane Operator Certification
    What's New in Tower Crane Standards?
    Cranes—A Walk Through Time—Technology and Regulatory
    Mobile Crane Blocks and Calculation of Sling Loads
    Top 10 Losses in Crane & Rigging
    Reliability Measures for Effective Training
    Key Issues in Crane Safety
    The Mechanics of a "Super Lift"
    So You Think You're a Lift Director?
    An Examination of Crane Incidents
    Safety of Equipment Around Power Lines

    The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) is an independent, non-profit organization established in 1995 by industry to develop and administer a nationwide program for the certification of crane operators and related personnel. Since then, NCCCO has administered over 800,000 nationally accredited written and practical examinations and issued more than 170,000 nationally accredited and OSHA-compliant certifications in all 50 states.

    "NCCCO to Offer Certification, Safety Demos, Examiner Workshops at CONEXPO 2014."-- FAIRFAX, Va., Jan. 9, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --. PR Newswire, n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

  • OSHA Launches Online Complaint System Making It Easier For Workers To File Whistleblower Complaints


    As part of its effort to protect employee whistleblowers, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration's Whistleblower Protection Program launched on December 5 an online complaint system to make it easier for employees to file complaints against unsuspecting employers. The Whistleblower Protection Program enforces the whistleblower protection provisions of 22 different federal whistleblower statutes, covering a broad range of industries and topics. These statutes protect employees who engage in numerous types of whistleblower activity, such as reporting a work-related injury, illness, or fatality; participating in safety and health activities; or reporting a violation of a statute or regulation.

    Workers may now complete a simple online form at the Program's website to initiate a complaint against their employer. This free online system provides yet another avenue for workers to file a whistleblower complaint. As before, workers may also file a complaint in writing or by calling an agency hotline or regional office. With the creation of the online complaint system, employers covered by the federal whistleblower statutes should expect whistleblower complaints to increase.

    Employers must be aware when making employment-related decisions that numerous anti-retaliation protections for employees exist, in addition to protections created by Title VII, the ADA, the ADEA, and other similar statutes. For example, all of the following statutes are enforced as part of the Whistleblower Protection Program and provide whistleblower protection to employees:

    Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA)
    Clean Air Act (CAA)
    Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA)
    Consumer Financial Protection Act (CFPA)
    Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA)
    Energy Reorganization Act (ERA)
    Federal Railroad Safety Act (FRSA)
    Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA)
    International Safe Container Act (ISCA)
    National Transit Systems Security Act (NTSSA)
    Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)
    Pipeline Safety Improvement Act (PSIA)
    Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
    Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)
    Seaman's Protection Act (SPA)
    Section 1558 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)
    Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA)
    Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA)
    Section 402 of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA)
    Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
    Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR21)
    Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21)

    TAKE AWAY

    The free online complaint system makes it even easier for workers to file whistleblower complaints. Employees can now file a whistleblower complaint quickly and simply without speaking to an attorney or an OSHA representative. With the New Year approaching and the anticipated increase in whistleblower complaints, now is an opportune time to ensure that policies are updated and managers are educated on the many whistleblower statutes that could lead to complaints.

    BakerHostetler's Whistleblower and Corporate Compliance Practice Team has significant and diverse experience protecting employers from whistleblower claims. We have worked with OSHA's Whistleblower Protection Program and successfully defended employers against whistleblower claims by their employees in many regions across the United States. We have also helped employers prevent whistleblower claims before they arise by updating policies, practices, and training. Please give us a call if you have any questions about potential exposure to whistleblower claims.

    Devine, Joseph C., and Ryan A. Cates. "United States: OSHA Launches Online Complaint System Making It Easier For Workers To File Whistleblower Complaints." OSHA Launches Online Complaint System Making It Easier For Workers To File Whistleblower Complaints. Mondaq, 27 Dec. 2013. Web. 27 Dec. 2013.

  • Loud music can kill, crane operator learns


    A mobile crane operator distracted by the loud music coming from his headphones accidentally killed his coworker at a construction site in Quezon City on Thursday afternoon.

    Signalman Richard Cortez suffered serious head injuries and broken ribs after he was hit by the crane. He was rushed to Quezon City General Hospital where he died nearly two hours later.

    The crane operator, Reynaldo Vicente, 31, a resident of Antipolo City, was placed under police custody and would be charged with reckless imprudence resulting in homicide.

    Case investigator PO2 Hermogenes Capili said the victim was a rigger or signalman at the construction site for Fisher’s Mall at the corner of Gen. Luis Street and Roosevelt Avenue in Quezon City.

    He was guiding Vicente who was operating a mobile crane around 4:10 p.m. on Thursday when he was killed.

    The police said that Vicente, who was listening to loud music on his headphones, failed to notice that Cortez was standing near the mobile crane. When the crane turned, it hit the victim in the head and crushed his ribs on the left side.

    Another worker, Garie dela Cruz, saw the victim sprawled on the ground and, with the help of other coworkers, rushed him to the hospital where Cortez died at 5:46 p.m.

    Aurelio, Julie M. "Loud Music Can Kill, Crane Operator Learns." Inquirer News. Philippine Daily Inquirer, 8 Nov. 2013. Web. 05 Dec. 2013.

  • OSHA Announces Top 10 Workplace Safety Violations For 2013


    Employers must comply with all guidelines and all workplace safety rules set forth by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and by state regulators. Unfortunately, employers often fail to live up to their obligations and allow workplace hazards to exist unchecked. OSHA inspectors on the state or federal level respond to complaints or allegations of workplace safety violations and conduct routine inspections of workplaces to identify unsafe conditions. If OSHA finds that an employer has violated safety rules, the employer may receive a citation and be fined or face other penalties.  [medical-doctor-1314902-m]

    OSHA issues thousands of citations annually for unsafe workplaces, and has announced preliminary data on citations that constitute the top 10 violations in fiscal year 2013.  Each of these violations puts workers in serious jeopardy of becoming injured or even getting killed on the job. A workers’ comp lawyer in New York  can represent workers injured by OSHA violations in seeking benefits through workers’ compensation.

    Top 10 Workplace Safety Violations in 2013

    An editor from Safety & Health presented OSHA’s list of the top 10 violations for 2013 at the National Safety Council’s 2013 Congress and Expo, as an OSHA spokesperson was unable to attend the Expo as a result of the October 2013 government shut-down. The most cited violations of workplace safety standards that made the top 10 list included:

    Fall protection standards – 8,241 violations.
    Hazard communication standards – 6,156 violations.
    Scaffolding standards – 5,423 violations.
    Respiratory protection – 3,879 violations.
    Electrical and/or wiring methods – 3,452 violations.
    Powered industrial trucks – 3,340 violations.
    Ladders – 3,31 violations.
    Lockout/Tagout – 3,254 violations.
    Electrical, general requirements – 2,745 violations.
    Machine guarding – 2,701 violations.

    Looking at the list of citations, many of the same violations also made the list of top reasons for citations in 2012 as well. For example, fall protection standards was the number one cause of citations in both 2012 and 2013, and hazard communication standards and respiratory protection issues were three and four. However, lockout/tagout moved from the number five most common reason for citations in 2012 to the ninth most common reason for a citation in 2013. Electrical and wiring methods, on the other hand, moved up from the seventh most common violation in 2012 to the fifth most common reason for citations in 2013.

    With so many of the same violations occurring year after year, it likely comes as no surprise that the majority of workplace injuries and deaths occur as a direct result of unsafe conditions and accidents that could have been prevented if employers complied with all OSHA rules. For example, falls were the leading cause of death in the construction industry in 2011 and accounted for 259 out of 738 fatalities. Electrocutions were also considered part of the “fatal four” causes of workplace injuries and accounted for 69 deaths, which was nine percent of deaths in the construction industry.

    The fact that falls are both the number one reason for citation and the number one cause of worker death suggests that if employers actually took steps to do better with fall protection, many more workers might avoid fatal injuries on the job. The same is true for all the top violations leading to citations. If employers obeyed the rules, there would be fewer penalties imposed by OSHA and fewer injuries suffered by workers.

    "OSHA Announces Top 10 Workplace Safety Violations For 2013." Pasternack Tilker Ziegler Walsh Stanton & Romano LLO. Pasternack Tilker Ziegler Walsh Stanton & Romano LLO, n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2013.

  • NH company cited by OSHA for 21 safety violations


    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration says a New Hampshire textiles company is facing $115,000 in fines for 21 serious violations of workplace safety standards at its Hampton plant.

    OSHA started investigating Foss Manufacturing Co. in April after a worker’s complaint.

    OSHA’s New Hampshire area director says employees were exposed to potential electrocution, burns, amputation, crushing and laceration injuries and hearing loss.

    A company spokesman did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment.

    Among the issues, OSHA says Foss Manufacturing failed to provide fall protection equipment, face shields and insulated gloves and to protect a worker exposed to an arc flash where electrical equipment had not been deenergized before servicing,

    The company has 15 days to comply, meet with OSHA or contest the findings.

    "NH Company Cited by OSHA for 21 Safety Violations." Boston.com. The Boston Globe, 6 Nov. 2013. Web. 8 Nov. 2013.

  • OSHA Issues Tougher Chemical Guidelines For Employers


    Law360, Washington (October 24, 2013, 6:36 PM ET) -- The Occupational Safety and Health Administration on Thursday issued new voluntary standards for employers for workplace hazardous chemical exposure, saying the current outdated standards put workers at risk of harm even if their employers fully comply with exposure regulations.

    OSHA’s chemical exposure rules are “dangerously out of date,” with the majority of them being adopted in 1970, according to David Michaels, the assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. 

    This problem cannot be easily solved through new regulations, with a complex rulemaking process making it “extremely difficult” for OSHA to update its safety standards in a timely way, Michaels said in a conference call Thursday.

    "We recognize this and are developing new ways to approach the problem of workplace exposure to hazardous substances," he said.

    As such, the agency has moved to make it easier for employers to voluntarily reduce the level of chemical exposure and launched two web-based resources, so the numbers of workers who get sick or die from workplace chemical exposure, which, according to OSHA, reaches into tens of thousands each year, is lowered.

    The first of these is a “toolkit” walking employers and workers through guidance on how to eliminate the use of, or make informed substitution choices for, hazardous chemicals, materials or processes used in the workplace, which Michaels said was the “most efficient and effective way” to protect workers from unnecessary chemical exposure.

    By using the toolkit, employers will not only improve worker well-being and advance “socially responsible” practices, but they will also improve workplace efficiency and performance and reduce expenses and risks, OSHA claims.

    The agency also launched a new list of annotated permissible exposure limits, tables and listing-recommended voluntary limits for air concentrations of chemicals, based on new scientific data, industrial experience and developments in technology.

    The tables will allow for side-by-side comparison of the current OSHA limits — which, according to the agency, are “in many instances … not sufficiently protective of workers' health” — to the recommended exposure limits set by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and so-called threshold limits set by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

    The tables will also allow for comparison between the OSHA PELs and the more-stringent statewide PELs put in place by the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, which has the most extensive list of PELs of any state, according to OSHA.

    While reiterating that compliance with the recommendations in the agency’s new guidance was entirely voluntary and not subject to any regulatory penalty, Michaels said he would still advise employers, “who want to ensure that their workplaces are safe,” to utilize the occupational exposure limits set out in the annotated PEL list.

    “Simply complying with OSHA's antiquated PELs will not guarantee that workers will be safe,” he said.

    Wilson, Daniel. "OSHA Issues Tougher Chemical Guidelines For Employers." Law360. LexisNexis, 24 Oct. 2013. Web. 01 Nov. 2013.

  • Training for new OSHA Hazard Communication Standard must be complete by December 1, 2013


    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazard Communication Standard has been changed to now align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling Chemicals (GHS). Since the Hazard Communication Standard became effective almost 30 years ago, employers have had to provide “right to know” information to their employees about the chemical hazards in their workplace. The key difference in the revised standard, however, is that it provides a single set of harmonized criteria for classifying chemicals according to their health and physical safety hazards as opposed to the previous standard that allowed chemical manufacturers and importers to convey information on the labels in whatever format they chose. This revised standard, like the original one, requires chemical manufacturers and importers to evaluate chemicals they produce or import and provide hazard information to employers and employees. However, the old standard’s “Material Safety Data Sheets” (MSDS) are now replaced by more detailed Safety Data Sheets (SDS’s) as well as new labeling requirements. Under the new standard, OSHA is requiring that all employees be trained on the new rule and how to understand the new SDS’s and new labels by December 1, 2013. 

    The major revisions to the Hazard Communication Standard include the following:

    Hazard Classification: Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to determine the hazards of the chemicals they produce or import. Hazard classification under the new, updated standard provides specific criteria to address health and physical hazards as well as classification of chemical mixtures.
    Labels: Chemical manufacturers and importers must provide a label that includes a signal word, pictogram, hazard statements, and precautionary statements for each hazard class and category.
    Safety Data Sheet (SDS): The new format requires 16 specific sections, ensuring consistency in presentation of important protection information. The new SDS’s will replace the currently used MSDS’s.
    Information and training: To facilitate understanding of the new system, the revised standard requires that all covered employees be trained by December 1, 2013 on the new label elements and safety data sheet (SDS’s) format, in addition to the current standard training requirements.

    What Employers Need To Do and When:

    Employers using hazardous chemicals (as defined by the standard) need to continue to update safety data sheets when the new ones become available and provide training on the new label elements. In addition, employers need to update their hazard communication programs when new hazardous chemicals are introduced.

    Chemical producers should review hazard information for all chemicals produced or imported, classifying chemicals according to the new classification criteria, and update labels and safety data sheets.

    The final rule became effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register; however, OSHA has provided the following extended compliance dates to meet the new requirements:

    December 1, 2013 :Employers must train employees on the new label elements and SDS format.
    June 1, 2015: Compliance with all modified provisions of the final rule for chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors, and employers. The only exception is for the December 1, 2015, distributor compliance date below.
    December 1, 2015: Distributors shall not ship containers labeled by the chemical manufacturer or importer unless it is a GHS label.
    June 1, 2016: Employers must update alternative workplace labeling and their hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards.

    This new standard covers all employees who produce or use hazardous chemicals in their workplace. All covered employers are encouraged to start the required training as soon as possible to ensure that all training is completed before the December 1, 2013 deadline.

    Foulke, Edwin G. "Training for New OSHA Hazard Communication Standard Must Be Complete by December 1, 2013." Lexology. Association of Corporate Counsel, 2 Oct. 2013. Web. 25 Oct. 2013.

  • OSHA Website inactive


    The OSHA website has been inactive since the 1st of October due to the federal govenrment shutdown.

    This website is currently not being updated due to the suspension of Federal Government services. The last update to the OSHA site was October 1, 2013. Updates to the site will start again when the Federal Government resumes operations. If you need to report a workplace fatality, hospitalizations, an imminent danger situation, or you are filing a hazard complaint, please contact our toll free number: 1-800-321-OSHA (6742); TTY 1-877-889-5627 (or contact OSHA’s area and regional offices during normal business hours.)

  • The Importance of Cranes in Construction


    Operating a crane is precise work. The person at the controls wields a lot of power, swinging heavy items into place while a crew on the ground assists. A small mistake could mean costly property damage and even, in a small number of cases, lost lives.

    In Alaska, the job is even more complicated. Operators sometimes work where there are no roads and in weather few other crane operators see—blowing snow, bristling winds, below-zero temperatures and freezing sea spray.

    STG Incorporated, a construction services company operating in Alaska since 1991, knows a lot about operating in tough conditions. Owner Jim St. George says the company got its start repairing failing tank farms in Alaska villages. Installing tanks and driving piles in villages around Alaska are still a large part of the company’s work, jobs that are assisted by a fleet of 23 cranes.  


    St. George says the company began using cranes because it made STG more competitive.

    In 1996, STG opened an office in Anchorage and he purchased Alaska Crane in 2001, an Anchorage-based crane services company. As STG and Alaska Crane’s workload expanded he bought more cranes, sending some to western Alaska to assist in contracts there.

    “Alaska Crane is more of a traditional crane service company while STG’s utilization of cranes is more geared to the completion of construction projects requiring their use,” St. George says.

    Today Alaska Crane is one of the largest crane services companies in the state. But St. George says there are plenty of other cranes at work here—hundreds, perhaps. From oil field services to ports and construction sites, cranes are picking loads all over Alaska.

    “No one does exactly what we do, but everyone does a part of what we do,” he says. “Some people do more port (work), some do more steel, some drive more piles. We do a mix and we focus pretty hard on construction.”

    St. George says he’s adept at operating cranes but his most recent acquisition, a Liebherr LR1600/2 crawler crane, is more crane than he’s comfortable operating. It’s an enormous machine, currently the largest mobile crane operating in Alaska.

    According to information from the German manufacturer Liebherr, the boom is geared specifically for erecting wind turbines. It can lift 660 tons and operates with a very sophisticated network of computerized sensors. It’s a big machine, but perhaps safer than older styles of crane, St. George says.

    “Years ago, you operated the crane by the seat of your pants and felt what it was doing. If you picked too much, it would start to tip,” he says. “The newer cranes … are much more controllable and much safer. The evolution of cranes is really toward a safer machine.”

    These days, another part of his business has captured St. George’s interest—installing wind turbines for utility companies around the state.

    “Some of us (at STG) feel pretty strongly about renewable energy, that it’s a good thing in the long term. We like to get involved in these projects, and we feel pretty good about the wind work we’ve done,” St. George says.

    The company has installed around 80 percent of the utility-scale wind projects currently in operation in Alaska, St. George says. Some of the communities they’ve worked in hold the distinction of having some of the highest energy prices in the nation. Wind power is helping reduce reliance on diesel and ultimately cutting energy costs for residents who pay nearly 50 percent of their household income on energy.

    “It’s made a really big impact out there (in rural Alaska) and we feel pretty good about that,” he says.

    STG was the contractor for Kotzebue Electric Association last year when it installed two direct-drive EWT turbines, each 75 meters tall, with a 900kw generating capacity.

    Kotzebue Electric Association project engineer Matt Bergan says the utility has 19 turbines operating today, 17 with smaller generating capacity and the two STG helped install last year. At peak wind times, about 75 percent of the utility’s power comes from wind. He says the utility hopes to expand its wind generating capacity and displace as much fuel as possible.

    That job was complicated by the remote nature of the work. Kotzebue only has one dock and Bergan says due to the size and weight of the pieces, they couldn’t be hauled through town. So STG and Northland Services landed a barge on a beach near the wind turbine site and offloaded a crane and the turbine parts there.

    The challenges didn’t stop when the parts were unloaded, says project manager Brennan Walsh. STG installed the bases for the turbines in 2011, then built an ice road in spring 2012 to move the large pieces over the tundra without doing permanent damage to the ground.

    “The Kotzebue project was unique in the fact that you’re dealing with some pretty sensitive geotechnical issues up there, with permafrost. It’s cold permafrost but if you have any disturbance to the ground, the results are noticeable.”

    The ice road was wide enough for the company to walk a 250-ton Kobelco CK2500 Series 2 hydraulic crane out to the site, along with the heavy turbine parts that had been offloaded onto the beach. It was time to erect the turbines, even though winter was still gripping the region.

    “It was pretty exciting. It was single digits (outside) and everything was cold and hard. We had to make sure all of the equipment was warmed up well in advance of any of the picks,” Walsh says. “We really had to pay attention to the weather; wind can add significant loading to the crane. And once it gets that cold and you start putting heavy weights on stuff, your rigging and shackles can freeze up. If you get a pick and put it into place and then try to cut the load loose, sometimes your shackles freeze.”

    STG worked through the challenges, Bergan says, and did such a great job he hopes to work with them again in the future.

    “They have a broad wealth of experience in rural logistics, winter construction, just about everything. They seek out unique solutions to difficult problems,” he says. “We have a very high opinion of them after this project.”

    The company also worked with CIRI this year to install the eleven GE turbines, each with a generating capacity of 1.6 megawatts, now generating electricity on Fire Island, just off Anchorage’s shore.

    St. George says the company was a subcontractor to Tetra Tech, which was the general contractor on the Fire Island wind project. The company used the Liebherr LR1600/2 crawler crane along with four others on that job.

    The company had been talking with CIRI officials for a number of years about the project, St. George says, and was excited to be part of the team that completed the work.

    “There’s some gratification in being able to see a project,” St. George says. “I can see Fire Island from my home.”

    White, Rindi. "The Importance of Cranes in Construction." Alaska Business Monthly. Alaska Business Monthly, 1 Mar. 2013. Web. 02 Oct. 2013.

  • Mamaroneck firm faces nearly $250G OSHA fine for NYC hotel work


    NEW YORK — Flintlock Construction Services LLC, based in Mamaroneck, faces $249,920 in fines by the federal OccupationalSafety and Health Administration over safety violations at a New York City work site.

    The agency announced the proposed fines Tuesday. The violations stem from a March 21 inspection of a 23-story hotel construction site at 325 W. 33rd St. in midtown Manhattan, a new Fairfield Inn & Suites.

    Flintlock was cited on seven violations of OSHA’s fall-protection and scaffolding standards that involved workers exposed to potentially fatal falls of up to 26 feet while they were on scaffolding.

    OSHA said Flintlock failed to provide and ensure the use of fall protection, such as guardrails or personal fall-arrest systems, for workers on the scaffold; the scaffold lacked a safe means of access, causing workers to climb its cross-bracing to reach their work platforms; the work platforms were not fully planked; and the scaffold was not tied off to restrain it from tipping.

    A person who answered the telephone at Flintlock’s Mamaroneck headquarters said the company had no comment.

    Flintlock’s fine was one of four totaling $272,000 that OSHA gave out for violations at the hotel site; the rest went to New York City-based companies.Due to the severity of the violations Flintlock has been placed in OSHA’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which mandates targeted follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with the law, the agency said. The SVEP focuses on recalcitrant employers that endanger workers by willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations.

    Garcia, Ernie. "Mamaroneck Firm Faces Nearly $250G OSHA Fine for NYC Hotel Work." Lohud.com. The Journal News, 24 Sept. 2013. Web. 25 Sept. 2013.

  • OSHA focuses on crane safety in Northwest


    US regulator OSHA has launched a programme aimed at reducing serious injuries and fatalities associated with the operation of cranes in construction, general industry and maritime operations for employers under federal OSHA jurisdiction in Idaho, Alaska, Washington and Oregon.

    The association said that in order to help improve compliance, officers would conduct inspections at ports, construction sites and other locations where cranes are in use. OSHA also said that they would also conduct outreach, training, on-site consultation and use partnerships, alliances, and participation in the Voluntary Protection Program in an effort to improve compliance and prevent serious injuries and fatalities.

    OSHA said that it had investigated 13 fatal accidents involving cranes in the past five years in areas where the federal agency has jurisdiction in the four Northwestern states. The most common hazards leading to serious injuries and fatalities were crane tip-overs, people being struck by a crane, electrocutions, being caught in between a crane and other equipment or objects, and falls from the equipment.Federal OSHA's jurisdiction is shared with state-run safety and health programs in Washington, Oregon and Alaska.

    "OSHA Focuses on Crane Safety in Northwest." - Cranes Today. Cranes Today, 18 June 2013. Web. 09 Aug. 2013. <http://www.cranestodaymagazine.com/news/osha-focuses-on-crane-safety-in-northwest-180613/>.

  • OSHA announces changes to recordkeeping rule for federal agencies to improve tracking of federal workplace injuries, illnesses.


    WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration today issued a final rule that will require all federal agencies to submit their OSHA-required injury and illness data to the Bureau of Labor Statistics every year. This data will allow OSHA to analyze the injuries and illnesses that occur among the more than two million federal agency workers and develop training and inspection programs to respond to the hazards identified.

    "This change provides OSHA an opportunity to collect injury and illness data from all federal agency establishments," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. "The data will us help streamline and improve programs to reduce occupational hazards and prevent injuries, illnesses and deaths within the federal workforce."

    Other changes to the recordkeeping rule include amending the date when agencies must submit their annual reports to the secretary of labor and the date when the secretary must submit a report to the president. The rule will also restate that volunteers are considered employees of federal agencies and explain how volunteers' injuries should be recorded in agency injury and illness logs. The rule will clarify the definition of federal establishment and explain when contract employees should be included on an agency's log.

    Collection of establishment level information will enable OSHA to develop programs to assist agencies in meeting their injury and illness targets under the Protecting Our Workers and Ensuring Reemployment initiative. The POWER Initiative, which covers fiscal years 2011 through 2014, was established by President Obama to extend prior federal government workplace safety and health efforts by setting aggressive performance targets, encouraging the collection and analysis of data on the causes and consequences of frequent or severe injury and illness and prioritizing safety and health management programs that have proven effective in the past.

    Federal agencies have been required to follow the same recording and reporting requirements as the private sector since January 2005. Information on the final rule can be found in the Federal Register notice.

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

    "OSHA Announces Changes to Recordkeeping Rule for Federal Agencies to Improve Tracking of Federal Workplace Injuries, Illnesses." OSHA.gov. OSHA, 2 Aug. 2013. Web. 05 Aug. 2013. <https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES>.

  • Construction industry’s year-over-year fuel consumption sees first dip since Sept. 2012


    WEX recently released its construction fuel consumption index for June, showing the first year-over-year decline since Sept. 2012.

    The index measures national fuel consumption statistics for the construction industry to provide an month-to-month measure of construction activity in the United States.

    The index showed a decrease of 0.6 percent in fuel consumption by the construction industry since June 2012, indicating a slowing in activity. However, month-to-month numbers showed an increase of 0.8 percent.- See more at: http://www.equipmentworld.com/construction-industrys-year-over-year-fuel-consumption-sees-first-dip-since-sept-2012/#sthash.VkGTlwZk.dpuf

    Grayson, Wayne. "Business." Construction Industry's Year-over-year Fuel Consumption Sees First Dip since Sept. 2012. Equipment World, 12 July 2013. Web. 12 July 2013. <http://www.equipmentworld.com/construction-industrys-year-over-year-fuel-consumption-sees-first-dip-since-sept-2012/>.

  • Stadium Construction Projects for the 2014 FIFA Soccer World Cup in Brazil: Large Fleet of Liebherr-Cranes on the Job


    Nine out of twelve stadium construction projects for the 2014 FIFA Soccer World Cup are being conducted with help of Liebherr Cranes. For this event, which takes place in Brazil from June 12 to July 13, 2014, all host cities are engaged to update or establish appropriate stadium infrastructure. A total 64 matches will be played during the tournament.

    Six stadiums are being newly constructed in the cities of Cuiabá (Arena Pantanal), Manaus (Arena Amazônia), Natal (Arena das Dunas), Recife (Arena Pernambuco), Salvador (Arena Fonte Nova) and São Paulo (Arena Corinthians). The other six host cities are modernizing existing stadiums. These include Belo Horizonte (Estádio Mineirão), Brasília (Mané Garrincha), Curitiba (Arena da Baixada), Fortaleza (Estádio Castelão), Porto Alegre (Estádio Beira-Rio) and the famous Maracanã of Rio de Janeiro. The technical guidelines and the required timelines for all of these projects have been issued by the ‘Fédération Internationale de Football Association’ (FIFA).

    The estimated total investment for construction and modernization of these projects amounts to more than BRL 1.9 billion (US$ 900 million).

    Liebherr Cranes on the job in these projects include 15 Top-Slewing Tower Cranes of the EC-B, EC-H, and HC series with load moments from 110 to 280 mt, ten LTM All-Terrain Cranes with load capacities from 100 to 500 tonnes, four large Crawler Cranes rated 400 to 1,350 tonnes as well as one 100-tonne Telescopic Crawler Crane.

    "Stadium Construction Projects for the 2014 FIFA Soccer World Cup in Brazil: Large Fleet of Liebherr-Cranes on the Job." Liebherr.us. N.p., 20 Dec. 2012. Web. 17 May 2013.

  • CRC/ICHC 2012 to be held in New Orleans


    New Orleans has been announced as the setting for this year’s two-day jointly held Crane & Rigging Conference/Industrial Crane & Hoist Conference (CRC/ICHC), scheduled to start on 23 May.

    This year, the Hampton Inn Hotel and Suites adjacent to the New Orleans Convention Center will serve as the venue for the CRC/ICHC, with the event organiser Maximum Capacity Media (MCM) choosing New Orleans for its proximity to the wealth of petrochemical installations and refineries on the Gulf Coast.

    At the two-day event, speakers will focus on the theme of ‘Tools for Effective Crane and Rigging Management’, targeting safety managers, crane and rigging supervisors, plant managers and risk management personnel.

    Aimed at both attendees interested in the use of industrial overhead cranes and those more focused on mobile hydraulic crane applications, the event will feature CRC/ICHC joint sessions looking at accident trends, training techniques, rigging inspection and best practice.

    Both manufacturer Columbus McKinnon and Crane Institute Certification (CIC) are named as event partners, with Load Systems International named as lunch sponsor at the event.

    Crane Institute Certification executive director, Debbie Dickinson, said: “The purpose of this event is right on target with the needs of the industry. The conference will assist the industry in understanding and creating viable solutions to difficult problems.

    CIC and Columbus McKinnon are collaborating with MCM in order to create opportunities for safer, more productive and profitable work.”

    Load Systems International’s president and CEO, David Smith, also added: “LSI has been a sponsor of three CRC/ICHC conferences to date. We find, overall, that the event draws a broad cross section of key industry personnel, exposing us to a diverse range of new customer opportunities.

    “I’m personally excited to see New Orleans as the location for the next venue which is in close proximity to marine, offshore and land-based crane operations.”

    MCM president Guy Ramsey commented: “After two successful years in Houston, MCM Events decided to move our annual CRC/ICHC conference to New Orleans based on input from past exhibitors and presenters. The city offers an ideal location near the Gulf Coast’s massive refinery and petrochemical industries. In addition, major engineering and construction efforts continue rebuilding the area after the 2005 Hurricane Katrina caused major destruction.”

    "CRC/ICHC 2012 to Be Held in New Orleans." Cranes Today. Cranes Today, 4 Jan. 2012. Web. 02 May 2013.

  • Barnhart launches dual-lane heavy transport system for US roads


    Barnhart Crane and Rigging has added a custom-engineered product to its rental inventory, the WesTrac Transportation System, useful for hauling heavy loads while meeting road requirements on the western coast of the US.

    Barnhart also plans to introduce a new EasTrac System designed specifically to meet Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements on the East Coast.

    Barnhart's engineers worked with German trailer manufacturer Goldhofer to create WesTrac, which it describes as a new class of dual-lane transporter with added features.

    WesTrac’s design includes the features a modular platform trailer except the axle spacing and footprint meet DOT requirements for roads and highways on the West Coast.

    Barnhart intends the system to be used to increase mobilization and travel speed.

    WesTrac can be configured to variable widths for dual-lane loading, and for handling payloads over 267t (600,000 lbs).

    Barnhart's Jeff Latture, senior vice president of sales and marketing, said, "Extremely heavy loads on public roads and across bridges pose challenges [for firms looking] to meet DOT requirements.”

    “Traditionally, transportation systems relied on two-axle dollies. Those have allowed Barnhart to complete some of the heaviest long hauls in the US," he said.

    "The addition of our Goldhofer WesTrac dual-lane transport system type THP/CA to Barnhart's cool tools inventory gives us the ability to transport over-dimensional and super heavy hauls," Latture said.

    "Barnhart's Long Beach, CA branch has a dedicated team that will provide planning and execution expertise with the new WesTrac System."

    Barnhart Crane and Rigging, with 27 locations across the US, has been a national supplier of heavy lifting and transportation solutions since 1969. The company provides storage, logistics, machinery moving and plant relocation services.

    "Barnhart Launches Dual-lane Heavy Transport System for US Roads." Cranes Today. N.p., 16 Feb. 2012. Web. 08 Apr. 2013.

  • Barnhart launches dual-lane heavy transport system for US roads


    Barnhart Crane and Rigging has added a custom-engineered product to its rental inventory, the WesTrac Transportation System, useful for hauling heavy loads while meeting road requirements on the western coast of the US.

    Barnhart also plans to introduce a new EasTrac System designed specifically to meet Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements on the East Coast.

    Barnhart's engineers worked with German trailer manufacturer Goldhofer to create WesTrac, which it describes as a new class of dual-lane transporter with added features.

    WesTrac’s design includes the features a modular platform trailer except the axle spacing and footprint meet DOT requirements for roads and highways on the West Coast.

    Barnhart intends the system to be used to increase mobilization and travel speed.

    WesTrac can be configured to variable widths for dual-lane loading, and for handling payloads over 267t (600,000 lbs).

    Barnhart's Jeff Latture, senior vice president of sales and marketing, said, "Extremely heavy loads on public roads and across bridges pose challenges [for firms looking] to meet DOT requirements.”

    “Traditionally, transportation systems relied on two-axle dollies. Those have allowed Barnhart to complete some of the heaviest long hauls in the US," he said.

    "The addition of our Goldhofer WesTrac dual-lane transport system type THP/CA to Barnhart's cool tools inventory gives us the ability to transport over-dimensional and super heavy hauls," Latture said.

    "Barnhart's Long Beach, CA branch has a dedicated team that will provide planning and execution expertise with the new WesTrac System."

    Barnhart Crane and Rigging, with 27 locations across the US, has been a national supplier of heavy lifting and transportation solutions since 1969. The company provides storage, logistics, machinery moving and plant relocation services.

    "Barnhart Launches Dual-lane Heavy Transport System for US Roads." Cranes Today. N.p., 16 Feb. 2012. Web. 08 Apr. 2013.

  • Barnhart launches dual-lane heavy transport system for US roads


    Barnhart Crane and Rigging has added a custom-engineered product to its rental inventory, the WesTrac Transportation System, useful for hauling heavy loads while meeting road requirements on the western coast of the US.

    Barnhart also plans to introduce a new EasTrac System designed specifically to meet Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements on the East Coast.

    Barnhart's engineers worked with German trailer manufacturer Goldhofer to create WesTrac, which it describes as a new class of dual-lane transporter with added features.

    WesTrac’s design includes the features a modular platform trailer except the axle spacing and footprint meet DOT requirements for roads and highways on the West Coast.

    Barnhart intends the system to be used to increase mobilization and travel speed.

    WesTrac can be configured to variable widths for dual-lane loading, and for handling payloads over 267t (600,000 lbs).

    Barnhart's Jeff Latture, senior vice president of sales and marketing, said, "Extremely heavy loads on public roads and across bridges pose challenges [for firms looking] to meet DOT requirements.”

    “Traditionally, transportation systems relied on two-axle dollies. Those have allowed Barnhart to complete some of the heaviest long hauls in the US," he said.

    "The addition of our Goldhofer WesTrac dual-lane transport system type THP/CA to Barnhart's cool tools inventory gives us the ability to transport over-dimensional and super heavy hauls," Latture said.

    "Barnhart's Long Beach, CA branch has a dedicated team that will provide planning and execution expertise with the new WesTrac System."

    Barnhart Crane and Rigging, with 27 locations across the US, has been a national supplier of heavy lifting and transportation solutions since 1969. The company provides storage, logistics, machinery moving and plant relocation services.

    "Barnhart Launches Dual-lane Heavy Transport System for US Roads." Cranes Today. N.p., 16 Feb. 2012. Web. 08 Apr. 2013.

  • SC&RA members quiz OSHA over $1bn training requirement


    The programme for Cranes Asia, Cranes Today's annual Singapore-based conference, has just been finalised, with the late addition of regulators from Singapore and Malaysia.


    Cranes Asia takes place on Monday 10 and Tuesday 11 September, at the Holiday Inn Atrium in Singapore.
    Singapore's Mohd Ismadi, deputy director (engineering safety, ministry of manpower, and Malaysia's Mohd Fairuz Abdul Rahman, investigating engineer, division of forensic engineering, will be discussing regulation and accidents in their respective countries.
    The two latest speakers will be joining Frederic Perez and Jean-Marc Rannou, construction director and operations manager for Dragages Singapore, who will be opening the event by discussing the lifting requirements of the Singapore Sports Hub, one of Singapore's most iconic recent projects.
    The afternoon of the first day of the event will include presentations on the human and financial cost of accidents, from Bryan Cronie, regional SHE-Q director for Mammoet Singapore and Martin Banasik, principal engineer (lift and crane), Allianz Engineering.
    On the second day, the event will be opened with an extended presentation by industry expert Stuart Anderson, who will discuss the state of the market across Asia and Austrasia, with his well-regarded detailed statistics and insightful commentary.
    Anderson's presentation will be followed by David Potter of Australian Crane and Machinery. Potter will be explaining his experiences as a distributor of XCMG cranes, and what is involved in bringing Chinese cranes to developed markets.
    The event will close with two presentations on crane inspection. Brandon Hitch CraneSafe Engineer CICA, the Crane Industry Council of Australia, will discuss Australia's periodic and major inspection programmes. Geoff Holden, of LEEA, the Lifting Equipment Engineers' Association, will discuss recent revisions to BS 7121, which place more emphasis on tailoring inspection and maintenance programmes to individual cranes.

    "SC&RA Members Quiz OSHA over $1bn Training Requirement." - Cranes Today. N.p., 20 Sept. 2012. Web. 03 Apr. 2013.

  • Labour shortage in Canada


    A tower operator shortage in Laborador and Newfoundland, Canada has pushed the provincial government to grant $700,000 for a training programme.

    Enrolled operators can get the Red Seal certification required by contractors for work on the Hebron construction project, while meeting national regulations effective in the next 16 months.

    The Hebron gravity-based structure project will build an offshore oil platform off the coast of St Johns, on the island of Newfoundland, by 2017.

    Industry representatives working on mega projects in the province approached the engineer's union, Operating Engineers, Local 904, about the shortage.

    The union's heavy equipment training facility, Operating Engineers College, Hollyrood, then asked the local government for funds to train Red Seal-certified operators.

    The College has in the past opened its doors to crane operators when contractors needed them for big projects.

    The last time was in the 1980s, when the college trained operators for a Hibernia, Newfoundland, based project.

    The tower crane training program at the Operating Engineers College, opening in late fall 2012, will be the only one in the province tailored towards training Red Seal tower crane operators.

    Lorna Harnum, administrator at the Operating Engineers College said, "Now we have provincial exams, but when it becomes Red Seal trade, everyone across the country would be required write the same exam.

    "A Red Seal examination would allow you to go anywhere to work. It's not in effect just yet, but it's very close: 12-16 months."

    "Yes, there's a shortage mobile crane operators and a shortage of tower crane persons, not only in Newfoundland but across Canada. Now we're bringing them in from across the United States," said president and business manager of the Operating Engineers, Local 904, Roy Hawco.

    'We have apprentices but they aren't Red Seal certified yet," said Hawco.

    Hawco says this is because it is difficult for apprentices with 1-6,000 training hours to get the 54,000 required training hours in on a real tower crane.

    Brooks, Christina. "Labour Shortage in Canada." - Cranes Today. N.p., 2 Oct. 2012. Web. 03 Apr. 2013.

  • Crane and Rigging Conference and Industrial Crane and Hoist Conference to Address OSHA Crane Regulation


    With the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard requiring U.S. operators to be certified by November 2014, Maximum Capacity Media’s Crane and Rigging Conference and Industrial Crane and Hoist Conference will focus on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s crane operator certification requirements.

    (PRWEB) March 20, 2013

    With the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard requiring U.S. operators to be certified by November 2014, Maximum Capacity Media’s Crane and Rigging Conference and Industrial Crane and Hoist Conference will focus on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s crane operator certification requirements. The jointly held crane safety and management conferences will take place May 29-30 at the Indianapolis Marriott North in Indianapolis, Ind.

    The operator qualification requirements are part of the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard that governs crane safety. The standard is the product of a negotiated rulemaking process that began in the summer of 2003 and culminated in the publication of the final rule on Aug. 9, 2010.

    Discussions on crane operator certification requirements are heating up as the deadline for compliance draws near. Specifically, the industry is buzzing about the OSHA’s requirement to certify operators based on the type and capacity of the crane.

    In fact, OSHA has opened the door on these crane safety topics and has scheduled two informal stakeholder meetings in April to solicit comments on crane operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard. The agency seeks information from the public on the usefulness of certifying operators for different capacities of cranes, and the risks of allowing an operator to operate all capacities of cranes within a specific type. OSHA will hold separate meetings on April 2 and 3 at the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington, D.C.

    There is more to crane safety compliance than operator certification. At the Crane and Rigging Conference and Industrial Crane and Hoist Conference, industry professionals will also learn about OSHA’s new designations for personnel, such as lift directors, site supervisors, riggers, and signalpersons; hazards related to crane operation and how to assess them; and the crane technology and design advancements to meet current crane standards. These crane safety presentation topics include:

    -Practical Applications of the OSHA Crane Regulations for Safety and Risk Managers
    Mark Steinhofer, Account Manager of Site Operations, Safety Management Group

    -Lift Planning for Heavy Lifts
    Jim Yates, SVP of Engineering and Technical Services, Barnhart Crane & Rigging

    -Leading Causes of Crane Accidents: Final Data from Haag Engineering’s Crane Accident Study
    Jim Wiethorn, Principal Engineer and Chairman of Haag Engineering

    -How U.S. Certifications Are Helping Fill Canada’s Labor Shortage
    Debbie Dickenson, Executive Director, Crane Institute Certification
    Fraser Cocks, Executive Director, BC Association for Crane Safety

    -Overhead Cranes and Hoists—Operator Issues and Requirements
    Frank DiMeglio, Technical Trainer & Inspector, NACB

    -Bringing Mobile Learning to the Jobsite
    Keith Anderson, Chief Rigging Engineer and Rigging Group Manager,
    Bechtel Equipment Operations
    Paul Drexler, Account Manager, Bechtel Equipment Operations

    -Complete Crane Communication
    John Egnatz, 30-year veteran operator

    Additionally, vendors from a variety of professional organizations, including Event Partner North American Crane Bureau, will be available to answer questions about complying with the upcoming OSHA crane regulation and overall crane safety.

    To view the complete agenda and register for the Crane and Rigging Conference and the Industrial Crane and Hoist Conference, visit http://www.craneandriggingconference.com/crc-ichc.
    Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/business/press-releases/article/Crane-and-Rigging-Conference-and-Industrial-Crane-4368947.php#ixzz2O6AEKQZK

    "Crane and Rigging Conference and Industrial Crane and Hoist Conference to Address OSHA Crane Regulation." Times Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2013.

  • New crane inspector certification programme from NCCCO


    A crane inspector certification programme has been developed by the NCCCO in conjunction with the Crane Certification Association of America (CCAA), offering inspectors of tower, mobile and overhead cranes distinct certifications.

    NCCCO’s National Crane Inspector Certification Program will cover six areas of content: pre-inspection survey, records review, visual inspection, operational testing, load testing and charts, and post-inspection.

    Successful certification at the end of the programme will ensure candidates are competent at inspecting cranes after assembly, repair, jumping operations and disassembly, in accordance with OSHA 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC.

    Candidates signing up for the programme are required to have at least five years of practical or educational experience relevant to cranes, and must provide detailed references, work history and educational background before being permitted to sit the exams.

    President of HESCO (Niantic, CT) and chairman of the CCAA, Ed Shapiro, said: “NCCCO and CCAA mutually recognise the importance of safe crane operations and the role of certification in ensuring that personnel have the knowledge necessary to inspect and certify cranes.

    “This latest CCO certification will effectively ‘close the loop’ on jobsite lift safety by providing a way for crane inspectors to show that they are qualified to inspect cranes and be sure that cranes are safe for use.”

    NCCCO’s new certification is the result of work by a 45-member Crane Inspector Task Force, which also included psychometric consultants from the International Assessment Institute (IAI), who have worked closely with the NCCCO since 1999.

    Each year of practical experience candidates have of duties such as crane operator, crane mechanic/technician, crane shop foreman and crane inspector are counted towards the five years acceptance criteria.

    In addition, qualifications covering engineering, physics, applied mathematics, applied science courses related to non-destructive testing, construction technology, heavy equipment technician/mechanic courses and welding technology count towards the five year total at a ratio of two year’s education to one year’s experience.

    NCCCO programme manager Joel Oliva commented: “We expect that this new crane inspector certification will be popular with owners and employers who understand the safety and cost benefits of a professionally developed assessment process and who recognize its place within a comprehensive risk management process, while also meeting their obligations under state and federal requirements.”

    "New Crane Inspector Certification Programme from NCCCO." Cranes Today. N.p., 15 Nov. 2011. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.

  • OSHA teams up with Montgomery County on falls campaign


    The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has teamed up with the Montgomery County Worker Health and Safety Commission on an awareness campaign about preventing falls in construction, the leading cause of death in the industry.In 2010, more than 10,000 construction workers were injured as a result of falling while working from heights, and another 255 workers were killed.

    OSHA's fall prevention campaign has also been developed in partnership with the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and NIOSH's National Occupational Research Agenda program. OSHA and NIOSH will work with trade associations, unions, employers, universities, community and faith-based organizations. They will also help provide employers and workers, especially vulnerable, low-literacy workers, with education and training.

    The poster campaign will be displayed in Montgomery County's public bus system and illustrates the hazards posed by working from heights in construction and the necessary steps to keep workers safe (such as harness and lines for roof work).

    Montgomery County is located in Maryland, south of Baltimore.

    "OSHA Teams up with Montgomery County on Falls Campaign." Cranes Today. N.p., 13 Mar. 2013. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.


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